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The Ten Benefits of Competition 

 

 

  • The benefits of competition is sparring against someone you have never fought before. Sparring at your school or gym you tend to fight the same people all the time and that can become a bit redundant. 

  • Competition can give a Tae Kwon do stylist (mostly kicking techniques) a chance to spar against a Kempo stylist (mostly hand techniques).

  • Competition can help you deal with the pressure of a combative situation. It takes you out of your comfort zone, which can sometimes be your school or gym. You can definitely see if what you are studying is working for you. On the other hand, lots of martial artists underrate their skills. They may be really good but never realize just how far they have come. Their progress will be clear once they have put themselves against another martial artist. It can serve as a confidence builder in some people, regardless of how well they do.

  • Competition can teach valuable lessons, such as how to accept defeat as well as being a gracious winner. Whether you are a Point Fighter, Kickboxer, or MMA Fighter, competition can give you a chance to test yourself. As well as showing you points of self-improvement such as patience, keeping one's temper, following the rules and keeping focus. The list can go on depending on the individual.

  • When you're moving up through the belt ranks, watching top-level black belt competitors can be inspiring. It motivates you to take your training up a notch and focus more on areas where you see room for improvement, such as conditioning, flexibility, speed, accuracy, self-control or power. It can motivate you to attempt a new technique or combination. 

  • It takes courage to face down a new opponent. Your adrenaline spikes, you feel the butterflies creep in and you may want to run in the other direction. This is good. Why? Because it teaches you how to control your emotions.

  • Sometimes getting beat can show you how much there is to learn and that you're not the best, as long as you can learn from the experience it can only benefit you. 

  • The best competitors in martial arts may not be the best instructors. Being able to teach is a different skill entirely, but those who are good instructors have usually competed at some level. It is very difficult to teach someone a martial arts technique if you haven't tried them yourself. If you can't talk from experience  you are only teaching theory. Entering a competition allows you to teach others what you know really works.

  • Always remember one of the most important parts is to always have fun.

  • Competition is one of many ways to grow as a Martial Artist as well as live by the principles the martial arts stand for.

   True Competition

The United Martial Arts Federation concentrates solely on presenting the best martial arts tournaments and events. The UMA's newsletter and open membership to all styles help us stay in touch with the martial arts community. This helps us develop and provide more competition divisions, seminars, and events. The UMA's membership and tournament enrollment fees help pay for the necessary equipment, supplies and room rental charges for these events. The UMA wants you to know there are no hidden fees, politics or point systems allowed in our Federation. To become the best you must simply 'be the best." Victory or defeat is not determined by politics but left in the hands of the judges. Never influenced by who's your instructor or the belt rank you may possess. The UMA believes and will always stand on being fair and impartial, treating all competitors with the respect and honor that they deserve. We believe in rewarding hard work and discipline, the will to at least try. As we have said before victory and defeat teach life lessons that we all need to experience at one time or another. A true champion is made by dedication, hard work, and sacrifice. Learning from one's mistakes and constantly improving on one's ability. Those attributes are what makes up a real champion and represents the true essence of the martial arts.

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